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Spikenard Oil, Some Uses

Spikenard oil (Nardostachys jatamansi) has a long history of use as a perfume as well as for its healing properties. In the Bible, Mary Magdalene anointed the feet of Christ with Spikenard and its fragrance filled the house. And because I keep playing around with it so I can describe it for you, the scent has now permeated throughout my house. ... Read More »

Myrtle Oil, Some Uses

In ancient times, Greeks and Romans honored poets with leaves of Myrtle, to suggest their fame would never die. (9)  Myrtle oil (Myrtus communis) was also the main ingredient in a 16th century skin-care remedy called “Angel’s Water.” In our day and age, it is still used in perfume. The scent is light and refreshing. It has Lemony, Eucalyptus-like overtones that ... Read More »

Spruce Oil, Some Uses

Spruce oil (Tsuga canadensis) comes from trees native to Canada and has a long history of use for respiratory issues. Native American Indians also used to smear the resin on their bodies as an insect repellant. The oil is distilled from the needles. The scent has sparkly top notes and makes you think of Christmas trees and rainy forests. Aromatic influences: ... Read More »

Lemongrass Oil, Some Uses

Lemongrass oil (Cymbopogon citratus) comes from a fast growing grass. It looks like the same plant that Citronella comes from, which is not surprising since they come from the same genus. Lemongrass grows to be about 3 feet tall and the stalk is used to produce the oil. It has a deep, intense, sweet, lemony scent without the tart overtones of ... Read More »

Cypress Oil, Some Uses

Cypress oil (Cupressus sempervirens) has been used for centuries in medicine as well as sacred incense. In the folklore of many countries, the Cypress tree is seen as the gateway to the afterlife, which is why it is often seen in churchyards. The aroma of the oil is deep and earthy, has a fresh tone that sharpens as it evaporates. Aromatic ... Read More »

Bay Leaf Oil, Some Uses

Bay Leaf oil (Laurus nobilis), AKA “Laurel Leaf” oil, comes from the Laurel tree which was also used to fashion the laurel wreath of ancient Greece, a symbol of highest status. It is also a popular culinary herb. Bay leaf oil has a pungent, young, fresh aroma. Definite spicy undertones but it grows sweeter as it evaporates. Aromatic influences: Promotes the fire of creativity and ... Read More »

Cajeput Oil, Some Uses

Cajeput (Melaleuca cajuputi) is related to Tea Tree but much harsher. It is often used for treating colds, headaches and infections.  The scent makes you think of pine and medicine, and you feel your lungs open up and breathe deeper. Aromatic influences: Pungent, warming, and strengthening. Builds strength, especially before an operation and during postoperative shock. Combines well with: Bergamot, Cypress, Juniper Berry, ... Read More »

The Art of Romantic Aromas

Aromas are the best way to influence mood. You can make someone feel happy, calm, energetic, relaxed, focused, romantic, etc by your choice of aroma. When the aroma of essential oils is used, the effect on the mind and feelings is complex, powerful, and subtle. The oils have a physiological action on the body, because of their therapeutic properties. When ... Read More »

Basil Oil, Some Uses

Basil (Ocimum basilicum) takes its name from the Greek word for a king — basileum. That might be because it was one of the oils used to anoint kings. It has an herbal, slightly licorice,  Italian food scent to it that lifts your mood and makes the lines on your forehead relax for a little while. Aromatic influences: Excellent aromatic nerve tonic, ... Read More »

Clary Sage Oil, Some Uses

Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea) makes you feel like spring. You feel like your energy has been reawakened, your eyes are brighter, you see the beauty of the world, and you’re ready to take on new challenges. Aromatic influences: Very calming; may enhance the dream state and bring about a feeling of euphoria. Mood enhancing, supportive, and regulating. Combines well with: Juniper Berry, ... Read More »