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Respiratory Disease

Holy Basil Oil, Some Uses

Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum  or Ocimum tennuiflorum) usually comes out of India. The leaves of the plant would be placed on the faces, eyes, ears, and chests of Indian Holy men, Brahmins, when they died, to aid their passage from this world into the next. It has a strong, bright scent with Read More »

Ajowan Seed Oil, Some Uses

Ajowan Seed (Trachyspermum ammi) oil is not a very well known oil. The plant comes from the Asian region, mainly India, and the seeds have a long history of us in curry powder. The oil is extremely similar to Thyme oil, even down to the scent. I actually have a hard time telling the difference. The only way I can tell the ... Read More »

Mountain Savory Oil, Some Uses

The plant has been used as a culinary herb for centuries, most often as a digestive remedy. Mountain Savory (Satureja montana) oil has a clear, yellow look to it and the scent is a bit like a mixture chrysanthemums and juniper trees. It has a slight medicinal aroma to it and makes you think of a good bar of old-fashioned soap. Aromatic ... Read More »

Dill Seed Oil, Some Uses

Early Americans would chew dill seeds during church to inhibit their appetite. (7) Dill Seed oil (Anethum graveolens) is often used for digestive issues as well as for colic in babies. And there is only one way to describe the scent. It smells exactly like pickles! Aromatic influences: Calms stomach. Reduces stress and promotes restful sleep. Clears the mind and sharpens ... Read More »

Roman Chamomile Oil, Some Uses

Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) was regularly used by ancient Egyptians and the Moors, as well as being one of the Saxons’ nine sacred herbs (maythen). It was called the “plant’s physician” because it also promoted the health of nearby plants. Roman Chamomile is distilled from the daisy-like flowers of the plant, harvested just as they bloom. While it is usually slightly yellow, sometimes ... Read More »

Spruce Oil, Some Uses

Spruce oil (Tsuga canadensis) comes from trees native to Canada and has a long history of use for respiratory issues. Native American Indians also used to smear the resin on their bodies as an insect repellant. The oil is distilled from the needles. The scent has sparkly top notes and makes you think of Christmas trees and rainy forests. Aromatic influences: ... Read More »

Lemongrass Oil, Some Uses

Lemongrass oil (Cymbopogon citratus) comes from a fast growing grass. It looks like the same plant that Citronella comes from, which is not surprising since they come from the same genus. Lemongrass grows to be about 3 feet tall and the stalk is used to produce the oil. It has a deep, intense, sweet, lemony scent without the tart overtones of ... Read More »

Bay Leaf Oil, Some Uses

Bay Leaf oil (Laurus nobilis), AKA “Laurel Leaf” oil, comes from the Laurel tree which was also used to fashion the laurel wreath of ancient Greece, a symbol of highest status. It is also a popular culinary herb. Bay leaf oil has a pungent, young, fresh aroma. Definite spicy undertones but it grows sweeter as it evaporates. Aromatic influences: Promotes the fire of creativity and ... Read More »

Cajeput Oil, Some Uses

Cajeput (Melaleuca cajuputi) is related to Tea Tree but much harsher. It is often used for treating colds, headaches and infections.  The scent makes you think of pine and medicine, and you feel your lungs open up and breathe deeper. Aromatic influences: Pungent, warming, and strengthening. Builds strength, especially before an operation and during postoperative shock. Combines well with: Bergamot, Cypress, Juniper Berry, ... Read More »

Spearmint Oil, Some Uses

Spearmint is the pastel that covers a Victorian wall, and Peppermint is its powerful child adorning the Industrial Revolution. Spearmint oil (Mentha spicata) has a lighter, brighter scent to it than Peppermint. It is gentler, but they can be interchanged. Because of the sweet minty flavor, it is most commonly used as a culinary herb. It makes you think of crisp, cool ... Read More »