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Tag Archives: G.R.A.S.

Balsam of Peru Oil, Some Uses

Balsam of Peru (Myroxylon balsamum var. pereira) It’s actually closely related to Tolu Balsam (Myroxylon balsamum var. balsamum) and they can be interchanged in recipes. Balsam of Peru comes from the resin produced by the Peru Balsam tree, an evergreen tree native to Central America. It’s also called “Black Balsam” and “Indian Balsam”.  The oil is Read More »

Angelica Root Oil, Some Uses

With a long history of use as a medicinal plant, Angelica Root seeds were reputed to give protection from the Plague. It’s healing powers were so great, the plant was considered to be from divine origin, hence the botanical name Angelica archangelica. Angelica Root essential oil is extracted from the root and the scent has a delicate, herbal, slightly minty feel to ... Read More »

Cassia Oil, Some Uses

Cassia oil is interesting. The botanical name is Cinnamomum cassia. This oil is the less expensive alternative to Cinnamon Bark so it is often called “poor man’s Cinnamon.”  The thick bark of the tree has to be removed carefully to keep it from curling like cinnamon does and the oil is extracted from the leaves, bark, and twigs. The scent of ... Read More »

Cumin Oil, Some Uses

Cumin oil (Cuminum cyminum)  is from the carrot family and is closely related to Fennel Seed, Coriander, and Dill Seed oils. Cumin seeds have a very long history of use as a cooking spice, the Greeks used it as a single spice like we use salt and pepper. The most common use of the seed is in curry. The essential ... Read More »

Black Cumin Oil, Some Uses

The seeds of Black Cumin also have a long history of use as a spice and as a medicinal herb. The Prophet Mohammed is purported to have said Black Cumin cures every illness except death. The essential oil is distilled from the fresh seeds. The uses are many for this oil. It can be used to help treat diabetes, used ... Read More »

Dill Seed Oil, Some Uses

Early Americans would chew dill seeds during church to inhibit their appetite. (7) Dill Seed oil (Anethum graveolens) is often used for digestive issues as well as for colic in babies. And there is only one way to describe the scent. It smells exactly like pickles! Aromatic influences: Calms stomach. Reduces stress and promotes restful sleep. Clears the mind and sharpens ... Read More »

Frankincense Oil, Some Uses

Frankincense (Boswellia Carterii) brings up exotic thoughts of India, sand, incense, perfume, and gifts to babies born in stables. It is a valuable essence used for centuries to treat a variety of illnesses as well as for cosmetics and fragrances. It’s scent has warm, sweet pungent notes that make you feel warm and healthy. Combines well with: Sandalwood, Pine, Vetiver, Geranium, Lavender, Bergamot, ... Read More »

German Chamomile Oil, Some Uses

German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is distilled from the dried flowers of the plant. It’s actually rather fascinating. The flowers are harvested just as they begin to bloom and then dried to preserve the active ingredients. Only then are they distilled. Like Blue Tansy and Yarrow, German Chamomile also contains the compound azulene, which makes the oil blue in color. German Chamomile has a pungent ... Read More »

Roman Chamomile Oil, Some Uses

Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) was regularly used by ancient Egyptians and the Moors, as well as being one of the Saxons’ nine sacred herbs (maythen). It was called the “plant’s physician” because it also promoted the health of nearby plants. Roman Chamomile is distilled from the daisy-like flowers of the plant, harvested just as they bloom. While it is usually slightly yellow, sometimes ... Read More »

Spruce Oil, Some Uses

Spruce oil (Tsuga canadensis) comes from trees native to Canada and has a long history of use for respiratory issues. Native American Indians also used to smear the resin on their bodies as an insect repellant. The oil is distilled from the needles. The scent has sparkly top notes and makes you think of Christmas trees and rainy forests. Aromatic influences: ... Read More »